Aboriginal Cultural Landscape Walking Tours offers guests a unique urban Aboriginal experience of the cultural landscape of Brisbane City, South Brisbane and West End.

Join Aboriginal scholar, Alex Bond on a walking tour of Brisbane, in which he highlights the traditional Aboriginal significance of places throughout this area, discussing important historical events which occurred during the colonial era, and explains the continued Aboriginal significance of the landscape today. If requested, Alex can be accompanied by Professor Paul Memmott as a support guide who will provide additional anthropological perspectives.

Tours are professionally organised through the University of Queensland. Both guides have immense knowledge and understanding of Australian Aboriginal cultures and lifeways and have held long-standing working relationships with members of the Indigenous community. Tours are informal and relaxed and invite open discussion between the guides and the visitors. We stop at various locations for toilet breaks, food and drink stops and to ensure everyone is having an enjoyable, informative and inspiring experience.

Tours are suitable for:

Corporate groups:

  • Corporate/Government
  • Educational facilitators
  • Cultural Awareness Training
  • Indigenous Supervisors and Mentors

Students: (must be a registered educational institution)

  • University students
  • College students

2. Meet your guides

There is a choice of either one guide (Alex Bond), or two guides (Alex Bond with Paul Memmott). Alex Bond provides the perspective of an Aboriginal scholar and a leader within the Goorie Aboriginal society of South-East Queensland. If Professor Memmott is included, Alex’s interpretations will be supplemented by a senior anthropologist who has spent his 45 year career acquiring a broad understanding of Aboriginal culture and history.

Alex Bond

Alex Bond strongly identifies as a member of the Kabi Kabi people of south-east Queensland, but also has descent links with the Waka Waka (Burnett River) and Kaanju (Cape York) and Kumu (Dirranbandi) peoples. He has an extensive knowledge base on Aboriginal culture and history in South-East Queensland. Alex is regularly employed at the Aboriginal Environments Research Centre (University of Queensland) for community-oriented projects. He is also a casual tutor and research assistant at the Centre and conducts guided tours of the Aboriginal cultural landscape in the Brisbane CBD for UQ students of anthropology, human geography and architecture. He has been conducting cultural landscape tours since 2011 and is passionate about sharing his cultural knowledge. In his spare time, Alex loves busking and playing his guitar.

Professor Paul MemmottProfessor Paul Memmott is an anthropologist and architect and is the Director of the Indigenous Design Place (IDP) and the Aboriginal Environments Research Centre (AERC) at the University of Queensland. Paul was one of the first full-time anthropological consultants in Australia, being principal of a research consultancy practice in Aboriginal projects during 1980 to 2008. His research interests encompass Aboriginal sustainable housing and settlement design, Aboriginal access to institutional architecture, Indigenous constructs of place and cultural heritage, Native Title, vernacular architecture, social planning in Indigenous communities, cultural change and architectural anthropology. Paul has been working with Indigenous communities for over 40 years. In Paul’s spare time, he loves doing yoga and swimming.

The Aboriginal Landscape Cultural Walking Tour is unique in that it combines Alex’s Aboriginal knowledge along with Paul’s anthropological and architectural expertise. The tour would be ideal for all those wanting to learn about the Aboriginal significance of Brisbane City and surrounding regions, from traditional times to present day.

Contact us

Please contact us for more information on how you can engage with AERC:
Linda Thomson
Phone: (07) 3365 3660

Email

* The Aboriginal Cultural Landscape Walking Tour is an initiative of the Indigenous Design Place, The University of Queensland.